Return to Website

Number Watch Web Forum

This forum is about wrong numbers in science, politics and the media. It respects good science and good English.

Forum: Number Watch Web Forum
Start a New Topic 
   Board|Threaded
Author
Comment
Telegraph promotes renewable energy

One thing I've noticed from Paul Homewood's "Not a lot of people know that" blog is that there seems to be a spate of articles in the Daily Telegraph in the past year or so promoting renewable energy written by business/financial journalists, specifically Jeremy Warner (who used to work for the Independent) and Ambrose Evans-Pritchard. A few examples of the articles are given in these debunking posts from the blog, "Jeremy Warner’s Battery Revolution", "Now Jeremy Warner Loses The Plot!" and "Ambrose’s Holy Grail":

https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2017/03/06/jeremy-warners-battery-revolution/

https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2017/02/04/now-jeremy-warner-loses-the-plot/

https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2016/08/13/ambroses-holy-grail/

I don't think I remember the Daily Telegraph particularly promoting renewable energy before, other than through the promotion by default that comes with the employment of environmental journalists. It isn't natural for a conservative-leaning newspaper to be enthusiastic about massive changes to the way that the country generates its electricity.

Bishop Hill once mentioned a conversation about environmental news coverage that he had with somebody from the Telegraph several years ago in this blog post from 2015:

link

In the conversation, Bishop Hill remarked that it was strange that the Telegraph had decided to give a job to the veteran environment correspondent Geoffrey Lean, as he couldn't see this impressing Telegraph readers. The reply was "Ah, that's simple". "He's not there for the benefit of the readers but because green advertisers want him".

It makes me wonder if something similar might be going on with the pro-renewable energy articles written by the Telegraph's financial journalists - they could be being produced to satisfy the requirements of Green-leaning advertisers in the newspaper. Articles written by financial journalists might be taken more seriously by readers than those written by environmental journalists, as financial journalists are not particularly noted for being pro-Green (though there are a lot of Greenies in the financial community). If articles are being produced for Green advertisers then that would be in effect another form of 'fake news'.

Email  
Huhne and biomass - by Dave Gardner - Mar 16, 2017 5:12pm